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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
to put off protesters by sealing off large parts of the city and closing off metro stations. hundreds of armed police and riot troops are on duty. but the protests are spreading beyond the capital. there are vigils and demonstrations across the country. rape is the fastest growing crime in india, an incident reported every 20 minutes, yet the issue has largely been ignored by the authorities until now. violence against women in india is making news around the world and the politicians are not taking -- paying attention. they say that this young woman's death will not be in vain. she is being called out in the his daughter, but she spent her final hours at a hospital in singapore. she suffered from severe organ failure as a result of her terrible injuries. >> her family is shattered by this development. at the same time, they realized it the best medical attention was provided to hurt and in the and it was the scale of the injuries that was too much. >> her body is being flown back from singapore for last rites as india which for the arrival of the victim. many are coming to terms with
of the answer is found in an elaborate system of irrigation, canals that helped the city produce a large agricultural surplus. although most remained farmers, irrigation freed some 30,000 to 40,000 people to pursue other jobs like making clay figurines. but it was not clay sculpture that transformed teotihuacan into an economic superpower. it was another material -- obsidian, a natural volcanic glass whose edge was as sharp as a razor. obsidian was the knife of the ancient world. 30 miles north of teotihuacan, archaeologists have discovered the major source of obsidian in a place called pachuca. this is alejandro pastna of the mexican institute of anthropology and history, and his colleague rafael cruz. they have come here to map the locations of ancient mines. let's go. [ glass crunching ] obsidian fragments litter the surface, the refuse of thousands of years of mining activity. the glass that formed here by nature was especially prized by the ancients because of a unique quality. interpreter: this obsidian was only formed in this deposit. most obsidian is black or gray, but the green
government figures, among the authority figures, and among society at large. >> afghan war victims have filed a class action suit against germany in a court in the western city of bonn. >> those claims are related to an air strike ordered by a german officer in northern afghanistan in 2009, which killed 90 civilians. germany had given some compensation to the victims' families without admitting responsibility. >> lawyers representing survivors of the air strike are demanding higher compensation -- more than 3 million euros in total. they complain the settlements arrived at immediately following the attack were too small. as far as the german government is concerned, the case is closed. >> 5000 u.s. dollars was paid in over 90 instances. this money was transferred to an account in afghanistan. the account was specifically designed to compensate these families. >> on september 4, 2009, a u.s. f-15 fighter jets bombed two fuel tankers, killing more than 90 civilians. a german officer called in the air strike based on faulty intelligence. the political repercussions were extensive. the german def
quiet they were largely unskilled and there were no opportunities in the south and went into another plantation. there were no villages and towns and cities in the north. in the north people could free slaves with opportunities in manufacturing where they could learn skills and trades. couldn't do that in the south. the only opportunity for work or for field hands and when the cotton gin was invented, and that absorbed all the slaves unskilled laborer and you now have i plantation owner, this rather cruel lower middle income people buying property in planting cotton prior to that, most of the poor whites in the south were against slavery because the slaves competed with them for jobs. but unlike most politicians come he put his political career on the line in favor of abolition. >> he was the first to stand up and he led the fight turned his congressional career, which really began after his presidency. he failed to be really did to the presidency. you brought this up before because he didn't have the common touch. he believed it was the need for dignity of a presidential candidate t
largely unskilled and there were no opportunities in the south. the word out of one plantation began to another plantation. there were villages and towns and cities in the north come in and in the north people could read the slaves. there were opportunities in manufacturing where they could learn skills and serve as apprentices and learn skills and trades. couldn't do that in the south. the only opportunity for work was field hands, and then when it caught him chain was invented -- cotton shane was invented, you now have a sort of patrician of plantation owners. middle and lower-income people buying property and planting cotton. prior to that, most of the poor whites in the south were against slavery because the slaves compete for jobs. >> unlike most politicians he put his political career on the line in favor of abolition. he was the first to stand up for emancipation and he led the fight throughout his congressional career which began after his presidency. he failed to be reelected and the presidency because he didn't have the common touch. he believed that there was beneath the d
. >> the carnage and the city left in their wake. activists say that dozens of people were killed when at least one rocket hit this mosque. they say that most of the .asualties were civilians > >> there is a large number of dead and injured. for now, so many civilians are trying to run away. >> more than 500,000 palestinian refugees in syria live here. but the cast also include members of the liberation of the palestinian general command. their leader is said to leave anti-chairman forces. is the first time it was hit. the president's forces have been fighting for weeks. activists say that the air strike on the campus the sixth such attack in the area. the videos show the damage caused by continuous artillery and rocket chilling in this city. many residential buildings were destroyed. shellings in thisng'rocket city. many residential buildings were destroyed. many of the dead included women and children. sunday's attack came as rebels fought to gain ground in and near damascus and beyond. >> at least six people have been killed in a series of bomb blast in northern iraq. at least 25 more were wound
on things. he loved being provocative. he largely created the new york city we now know, certainly the point of view. it inspired me because i have always looked up to people who sea change taking place and look at that as an opportunity instead of a threat. a couple of years before he died, i went to see him. he died about five years ago. he was at berkeley and at the time in his late 70's. he was running the graduates' magazine program at uc. he had serious cancer. it was very hard to understand him. he was still so excited about the student projects. he spent the entire morning taking me through these magazines his graduate students had created. he was an optimist and passionate about his work right to the end. it was also very instructive to recognize it is not work if you love what you do. >> let me follow-up on that. you have spoken about how you have never taken the easy path. you are drawn to where the heat is. that takes a tremendous amount of courage. why are you drawn to that? >> i do not know the answer completely except that i grew up as the oldest daughter and oldest granddaugh
of this mosaic that came to be this political machine. but by and large it was run by these two guys, an irishman and a connecticut yankee. it's the history of the city that's in the subtitle, fearless ethnics, political wizards, underrated scoundrels. we still have a lot of those. and, but it's a different town now. it's, i mean, it's no longer just albany. albany is, it's about five or six towns all put together. it's troy, it's schenectady, it's colony, it's saratoga. saratoga's only half an hour away. and these are great places to live and to see, and there's a lot to see in this town. town is coming back. it's also a great, a beautiful town. it's a really beautiful town. and a lot of people know it now. it doesn't have that reputation anymore that stanford white thought it had. >> albany, new york, is one of the oldest surviving settlements from the original 13 colonies and the longest continuously-chartered city in the united states. next, we hear from jack casey. his book tells the story of a mohawk woman born in 1656 who was recently named the first native american to enter saint hood. >>
' promotional film foretold everything from nuclear power plants that would light up cities to new and improved means of transportation. >> while nuclear power in locomotives, submarines, ships and even very large airplanes may all but revolutionize future transportation on land, sea and air. >> osgood: on december 2, 1957, 15 years to the day after that chain reaction in chicago, americans first commercial nuclear power plant opened in shippingport pennen. >> this plant has a secure place in american history. it is the first of the world's large-scale nuclear power stations exclusively devoted to peaceful purposes. >> osgood: today with just over 100 plants across the united states producing roughly 20% of our electricity, the nuclear industry's future stands at a cross roads. >> evacuation. please stay indoors with your windows closed. >> reporter: opponents of new plant construction point to the leak at pennsylvania's three mile island in 1979, to the soviet reactor meltdown in chernobyl in 1986 and to the fukushima disaster in japan after last year's earthquake and tsunami. supporters count
governments both large and small, the state of new york city dwovet -- government and so many others that are waiting to see if they will get some relief sew they can move tor ward with their plans. we beat back host of the crippling amendments. we beat back all of the crippling amendments an most of the amendments -- and most of the amendments. it's a very, very trying day, i think, for the senate. the century old tradition of different parts of the country rallying to help those that are beleaguered because of the difficult natural disasters continuing and the fact that 12 republicans voted for a bill that contain virtually no offsets except for the one amendment that passed last week. that is a full bill, a whole bill, a bill that gets new york and new jersey rapidly on the road to recovery fills us with hope that we can get something done and get something done quickly. when we press, when we explain to our colleagues what we needed and the desperation in here, they listened carefully. and we're really very, very glad about that. let me say a few specific things. there is very am
i was in the service. i'm also the parent of a son murdered on the south side of the city of chicago. and i am a pastor of my church. i am here to support hr 308. the large capacity ammunition device act which i have been a co-sponsor of since march of last year. hearing reports that there are 264,000, -- rifles manufactured each year in the u.s. and of those a rks 443 are exported overseas and 248,000 are used right here in the u.s. a bitter irony that we are confronted with at sandy hook is that the firearm industry's association their headquarters are located just across the highway from the sandy hook elementary school and while focusing on large capacity weapons is important, i also have a bill, hr 66 a. legislation aimed at establishing a nationwide system for prohibiting unlicensed gun ownership and granting the u.s. attorney general broader authority on the program. as sad as the sandy hook incident is for all of us, we must be cognizant of the fact that gun violence has been terrorizing neighborhoods in chicago, detroit, houston, washington washington, d.c. for over decades
and about box and the point i was trying to stress is i think the u.s. writ large, the government and also the civil society organizations and others were standing on the side lines here. they have to do private city along the same line. right now i think the u.s. policy, and again, u.s. government policy that those of you i think in the civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here where there's a desire among the political forces including the under islamists who want to bring about change in their political movement and were for the large part sitting on the side line here and we need to do more. >> we do need to move on to the q&a portion here. i would like to take a few questions from the audience the if you have a question raise your hand. we have migrants' circulating and we will take ten minutes before we begin to wrap up. >> i'm on the center for democracy and human rights in saudi arabia in washington, d.c. what's missing over on these discussions which i tend to miss them less and less is the fact that islamists haven't been told all along. the other point is there
. there was a sharia court in the city. these are basically consider it. >> civilian councils are trying. civilian councils are trying to wrestle more and more control from the fsa. the relationship as cooperative. in large depends on whether or not it meet that. i was able to meet with the commanders. i met with the supporters. not 10[inaudible] are either criminals gangs trying to take care of the chaos or the small extreme group that is well funded. majority are severly under funded. i met to the brigade commander with not enough food to go around. there's also that aspect but who is funded and who is not. they're trying to portray themselves as the ones that are leading the fighting in aleppo. they immediately rejected the coalition. this was reported. i got in touch with the commanders. the main fighting group in a lot of but of a video. they do not represent us. they said we recognize the council. i think of them as moderates. even their experience and food shortages. this is very well funded. this logic depends on whether 0% can receive reports. >> right now and maybe the case that people i
washington city, there was competition. he submitted a design for a palace. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly are inspiring. a european diplomat told the congress it was neither large nor of inspiring. but the answer. the congressman dave said, the building served a purpose. if it were larger and more elegant, perhaps some president would be inclined to become a permanent resident. >> vicki goldberg has gathered a few of her favorite photos in the president's home and photographs and history. watch at 7:30 on american history tv. john boehner's office described a meeting with president obama as a frank talk. he spoke to reporters about fiscal cliff negotiations, criticizing president obama for not being serious on cutting spending and lending herrmann the lack of an agreement. lawmakers have less than three weeks before the bush era tax cuts are set to expire and mandatory spending cuts take effect. this is about 10 minutes. >> good morning, everyone. more than five weeks ago, republicans signaled our willingness to avert the fiscal cliff with a bipartisan ag
documented a connection between doctors and overdoses involving objection city cotton and vicodin and other narcotics. >>> we have a recall to tell you about involving 30,000 motorcycle helmets. they are recalling large, extra large, and double extra large helmets. the company says they plan to fix the design immediately. >>> in case you have a package to mail, the post office will be open on new years eve. most will shorten retail lobby hours and close at noon. regular mail delivery will not be delivered. only express mail will be delivered that day. >>> expect major traffic delaws as you head up the sierra. >>> while we slept frigid temperatures slipped into the bay area. coming up how cold it is outside your door right now and what you can expect for the afternoon coming up. >>> if you are grabbing a cup of coffee you have to check this out. who says you can't snow board and still be in diapers. this toddler has been on the slopes building his skills. he's only 18 months old. he's just a little too young for the olympics in 2014. his family is most lick lie pretty proud of him already. >
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)